(020) 8455 0055
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
34 Golders Green Road
London
NW11 8LL

NO 1 AGAIN- DREAMVIEW ESTATES SWEEP THE BOARD

DREAMVIEW ESTATES WERE ANNOUCED AS THE NO 1 AGENT FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE IN NW11 BY THE THE ESTATE AGENTS REVIEW SITE, www.allagents.co.uk.

THE COMPANY WERE VOTED NO 1 IN 2013 AND 2014, 2ND IN 2015 AND VERY PROUD TO HAVE RECLAIMED THE TOP POSITION

DIRECTOR MURRAY LEE ALSO WON THE GOLD AWARD FOR INDIVIDUAL IN NW11 AND LETTINGS MANAGER, JOSH SAGAL WON GOLD FOR BEST OVERALL LETTINGS AND SALES AGENT IN NW11

EFFECTIVELY THE COMPANY "SWEPT THE BOARD"!

 

How does you agent comapre?2016 GOLD AWARD

DREAMVIEW ESTATES SELL HIGHEST PRICE HOUSE IN GOLDERS GREEN PART OF NW11

WE ARE EXTREMELY DELIGHTED TO ANNOUNCE WE HAVE BEEN INVOLVED ON A £3,000,000 SALE ON A HOUSE IN GOLDERS GREEN, NW11

A HUGE RESULT FOR OUR AGENCY AND FOR PRICES IN GOLDERS GREEN

THIS IS A TRUE BENCHMARK AND SHOWS THAT THE EFFORT WE PUT IN TO MARKETING OUR CLIENTS HOMES.


IF YOU WANT THE BEST SERVICE-TRY THE AGENT WHO GETS THE BEST PRICES !!!

CALL US NOW IF YOUR THINKING OF SELLING OR RENTING

UNDERSTANDING THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LEASEHOLD AND FREEHOLD

What is the difference between leasehold and Freehold?

When we talk about ‘owning’ property in England and Wales we have to consider the two main types of interest in land that exist, which are freehold and leasehold.

The freehold interest in land (sometimes referred to in legal terms as The Fee Simple Absolute in Possession) is the most complete interest that can be held in England and Wales, as all land is technically held subject to the Crown.  In practice it means the outright ownership of land or property for an unlimited period and applies to the majority of houses.

A leasehold interest is, on the other hand, a temporary right to occupy land or property.  A person who owns the freehold interest in a property may grant a lease on it to another person.  This creates a relationship of Landlord and Tenant (or Lessor and Lessee).  The lease will be a lengthy, written, legal document based on property and contractual law which sets out the rights and obligations of both the Landlord (Lessor) and Tenant (Lessee).  Most flats in England and Wales are held on leases.

A lease will be for a fixed term.  Historically most flat leases were for 99 years, although more recent leases may be for 125 years.  It is also not uncommon for leases to be for 999 years.

Although the lease on any property will be a complex document, the basic principle is that it will give the Tenant (Lessee) the right to occupy the property for the period specified in the lease.  The lease will normally specify that the Landlord (Lessor) will have to allow the Tenant (Lessee) ‘quiet enjoyment’ of the property provided that the Tenant (Lessee) in turn observes their duties under the lease.  The principal duty normally being to pay the rent specified in the lease to the Landlord (Lessor).

The rent payable under a long residential lease will normally be quite modest (often between £50 and £250) and reflects the fact that the lessee will usually be responsible for paying all the costs in connection with the maintenance and repair of the flat and will have also paid a considerable sum to purchase the lease in the first place.

We have said that a leasehold interest is a temporary right to occupy the property, albeit that this ‘temporary’ right may last for many decades.  It is this temporary nature that sets leasehold and freehold interests apart, as a freehold interest is permanent.

What happens then when the period specified in the lease comes to an end?  Effectively, when a lease comes to an end the Tenant (Lessee) no longer has a right to occupy the property and has to give back possession to the Landlord (Lessor).  The lease will usually include a clause which states that the Tenant (Lessee) will ‘quietly yield up possession’ on the termination of the lease. In reality a Lesee will start the process of extending their lease well before it expires.

This means that we have to look at the value of freehold and leasehold property slightly differently. A freehold property will always maintain its value when the property market remains even and will increase in value when house prices price.  A leasehold interest is a diminishing asset, however.  At the beginning of a long lease there will be little difference in value between a freehold and a leasehold property.  As the lease gets shorter, the leasehold property reduces in value.  At first the reduction is quite small, but as the lease gets shorter and shorter the value begins to fall more rapidly.  For example, a flat with a 50 year lease will only be worth about 70% of what an identical flat with a 99 year lease would be worth.

Article contributed by Matthew Price BSc MRICS of Peter Barry Chartered Surveyors & Lease Extension Consultants. If you have a question about extending a lease or purchaing a Freehold Ian Burden will be happy to answer it a www.leaseextensionadvice.com 

AMAZING WEEK AT DREAMVIEW ESTATES

What an amazing week at Dreamview Estates

Started with a completion of  £900,000 house sale and 2 new rental move ins.

By Wednesday contracts exchanged on a sale we agreed only a week ago and then yesterday a £1.6m sale we had been working on since before xmas went through !

Today we have had 2 more rental move ins and just now 2 more new offers on sale properties !

Who says its a quiet market? Not us at Dreamview Estates!

 

Thinking of seling or renting your home?

 

Contact the "action" agents!

 

 

HOW TO TRY AND BEAT CONDENSATION

 

What is condensation?

Condensation occurs when warm air comes into contact with a colder surface. Air contains moisture, and warm air holds more water than cold water. Therefore, when warm air comes into contact with a colder surfaces such as an external wall or windows, the warm air is unable to retain as much moisture as it did, and releases in onto the colder surface, causing condensation and soon after, mould.

 

Identification:

Sometimes it can be difficult to tell the difference between condensation and dampness. Generally, condensation can be characterised by water droplets or water film on non-absorbent surfaces. Also, there may be black mould growth ‘spots’ or the rotting of material occurs.

 

With dampness on the other hand, one would expect to see stain marks, paper peeling away, paint bubbling, plaster crumbling or white ‘tide’ marks on the walls. Also one may notice a damp, musty smell if the problem is actually inside the wall.

 

Discounting dampness as a cause:

  1. Check accessible plumbing for leaks.
  1. Check guttering or downpipes for cracks or blockages.
  1. Check the overflow and sink waste pipes for leaks.
  1. Have the roof examined for possible leaks.
  1. Check the outside walls for leaks.
  1. Check to see if the levels of the garden or paths are higher than the damp course?

 

Tackling condensation:

There are several measures that can be taken to help tackle condensation. These include:

  1. Use extractor fans in ‘wet’ rooms such as the kitchen and bathroom. Also closing the door whilst the extractor fan is on also helps.
  1. Dry clothes outdoors, or in a cool place in the property- the second of these will obviously impact the length of time it takes to dry your clothes but there will be less moisture held in the air at one time, thereby reducing the chance of condensation.
  1. Do not dry clothes on radiators; this releases vapour into the air very quickly, thereby increasing your chance of condensation.
  1. If drying clothes inside, ventilate the room. If using a tumble dryer, ensure that it is vented to the outside (unless of course it’s a condensing model).
  1. When people come in with wet clothes, hang them outside the living area to dry.
  1. Move furniture slightly away from external walls, this will allow a better flow of warm area to usually cold areas.
  1. Cover pans when you are cooking.
  1. Ensure there is enough ventilation in the property. The best way to remove water vapour is by providing adequate ventilation. Nobody likes draughts, but some ventilation is vital.
  1. Consider using a dehumidifier - domestic types are now available and can remove a surprising amount of water from the air.
  1. Avoid using paraffin or gas bottles for heating- these produce far more vapour than other types of heating.
  1. Add insulation so that internal walls are kept at a temperature above the dew point of the air inside.
  1. Your property’s airways (such as airbricks and chimneys) should be clear to allow airflow in and out of your home. Air ventilation is extremely important as you don't want moist air to be trapped in one part of your home as it will condense on your walls.

The best approach to heating in order to reduce condensation, assuming you have taken the previous twelve steps, is to heat your home at a low level for a long time.

 

Cleaning mould:

The presence of dampness from condensation can promote mould growth. Such vegetable life can exist beneath a paint film and erupt or destroy the decorative surface. Where condensation is cured, an effort should be made to reduce the mould growth by means of sterilisation. Normally a wash or scrub of small areas with an old toothbrush with a 50% Bleach / 50% Water mix will be sufficient to kill off spores that are no longer being fed. Fungicidal chemicals are also available from most DIY shops.

 

If all else fails:

Please contact a qualified damp / condensation specialist or alternatively an F.R.I.C.S surveyor.

 

Final thought:

It has been said that if one family and another family live as neighbours in a pair of semi-detached houses, and one family has bad condensation and the other does not; if they swapped homes and moved into each others houses, the sufferers would take their condensation problems with them - think about it!